‘Mind blowing’: Taylor Swift stunned as her new release smashes records on Spotify

Entertainment

Taylor Swift has thanked her fans for “doing something mind blowing” as her new release broke the Spotify record for most-streamed album in a single day.

The popstar’s latest offering, Midnights, sparked a surge of interest after it went live on Friday – and caused something of a stir with a couple of sweary lyrics.

Less than 24 hours later, the music streaming giant announced that the album had amassed the most streams in a single day in the platform’s history.

Reacting to the news, Swift wrote: “How did I get this lucky, having you guys out here doing something this mind blowing?!

“Like what even just happened?!”

It comes after Spotify users reported a huge spike in outages after the new album landed on the platform.

Swift has described the record as the story of “13 sleepless nights scattered throughout my life” and “a journey through terrors and sweet dreams”.

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It sees her turn away from the intimate indie songwriting of her two last albums, Folklore and Evermore, in favour of electronica, synth-pop and sometimes even hip-hop influenced beats.

Swift has once again written most of the album with Jack Antonoff, lead singer of rock band Bleachers.

In a post on her Instagram to mark the album’s release, she shared a photo of herself with her collaborators, and singled out Antonoff as her “co-pilot”.

She said: “Midnights is a collage of intensity, highs and lows and ebbs and flows.

“Life can be dark, starry, cloudy, terrifying, electrifying, hot, cold, romantic or lonely. Just like Midnights.”

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